Author Archives: Brian Lawler

About Brian Lawler

Brian Lawler is an Emeritus Professor of Graphic Communication at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo and currently Guest Professor at Hochschule München. He writes about graphic arts processes and technologies for various industry publications, and on his blog, The Blognosticator.

The Gegendruck

In our industry we throw around lots of arcane terms – offset, litho, ink-jet, gravure, roto, screen printing, make-ready, prepress, flexo, etc., etc. I’ve been doing my best recently to learn similar terms in German, some of which don’t have … Continue reading

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Running the Landa Nanopress

Part III After numerous visits to the printing plant where the Landa Nanopress is running I have a pretty good idea of how that machine works. I am assisted by a very nice diagram on the wall adjacent to the … Continue reading

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Printing on the Landa Nanopress

Part II In the fall, my Master’s degree students and I worked on a project to write and publish a book about street art and street artists in Munich. We chose to photograph the work of these artists in one … Continue reading

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Working with the Landa Nanopress

Part I Last September I moved to Germany to teach for a year at Hochschule München in the print and media technology program. This is my second time teaching here. The program is very similar to the program at Cal … Continue reading

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Designing a monogram font

Years ago I made a reproduction-quality proof of a type font in the Shakespeare Press Museum at Cal Poly. This font is comprised a sets of three letters that can be assembled into monograms. Monograms were quite popular for business … Continue reading

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Lining Livermore, der zweite Teil

This is a continuation of a blog I wrote two days ago. To read the first part, click here. After I put all the letters (called “glyphs” In typography) into a master Adobe Illustrator document, I built the destination environment for the … Continue reading

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Drawing the Lining Livermore font

Deep in the recesses of the back room of the Shakespeare Press Museum at California Polytechnic State University is a cabinet. It contains about 20 drawers of hand-set metal type. We never use this type because it is difficult to … Continue reading

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The birth of Bauschrift

I went on a journey last week to buy some foam-core board. En route, I saw a handsome metal sign at the Technische Universität München. In English, this translates (roughly) to: MATERIAL TESTINGOFFICE FOR CONSTRUCTIONFACULTY CHAIRLARGE SCALE CONSTRUCTION The sign … Continue reading

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German & EU Pharmaceutical Safety using Blindenschrift

I walked into the local Apotheke this afternoon to buy a couple of over-the-counter medicines. Both were easy to find. I paid at the cashier’s counter and turned down an offer for a bag to carry the two small packages. … Continue reading

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The advertising poster is enjoying a multilingual limelight

(Das Werbeplakat in mehreren Sprachen) I’m doing a casual study of what I call translingual advertisements here in Germany. Germans are famous for being multilingual. They begin studying a second language in elementary school, and many students graduate from college speaking at … Continue reading

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